Yuneec catches whale snot for science using drone rebranded as “snot bot”

Wayne Perryman, leader at the Cetacean Health and Life History Program, holds a hexacopter. Photo courtesy of Wayne Perryman.

Wayne Perryman, leader at the Cetacean Health and Life History Program, holds a hexacopter. Photo courtesy of Wayne Perryman.

To date, my favorite story about a use case for drones is hands down Wayne Perryman, a scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration who built a contraption for drones that allowed it to capture data from when a whale blows out what is essentially snot. And that snot contains valuable information for researchers, including little bits of cells and hormones to see what it’s eating, if it’s male or female, or if it’s pregnant.

It’s noninvasive, and it’s hands down incredible. (Read my Q&A with Perryman here).

Today, major drone manufacturer Yuneec International announced a similar partnership with Ocean Alliance, which will use Yuneec’s drones to collect data from whales. To do the research, scientists attach a petri dish to drones flown into the cloud of spray exhaled by whales when they surface. The drones, which they call “snot bots” can gather data that tell scientists about the health and fitness of the whale, as well as allow scientists to retrieve the data without the whale even noticing.MW-DZ410_whales_20151116151102_NS
Current methods of collecting the data from whales involves firing a biopsy dart from a crossbow, which causes stress to the whales.

“Snot bots are designed to remove the potential harm caused to whales during the research process,” said Iain Kerr, CEO of Ocean Alliance. “This is a lottery win for us as a company, the animals we study, and ultimately, humanity.”

I wrote about 5 other wild uses for drones over at MarketWatch.com. Check them out.
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