Category Archives: Tips

8 tips for flying a drone in cold weather

The following is a guest post by Jake Carter, a drone Enthusiast and writer at RC Hobby Review. Follow him on Facebook at RCHOBBYREVIEW.

Drones whiz and whip through the air at breakneck speeds. Unfortunately, these cool machines weren’t designed for cold weather. It’s not the friendliest condition for them, but with some preparation beforehand, you can capture the beauty of rolling winter landscapes from a bird’s-eye perspective.

Before flying, read your drone’s user manual. Most quadcopters are designed to fly in a temperature range of 32 degrees Fahrenheit to 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Flying outside that range may put your drone at risk. But if your drone can handle the cold conditions, then read on — then get flying!

1. Beware of ice

The arch-nemesis of all helicopters and planes, ice endangers drones too. Ice accumulating on the propeller blades, alters the weight distribution, hurting the drone’s ultimate aerodynamics. Cold air over warm water causes evaporation, and this evaporative fog will refreeze on surrounding surfaces, including on the drone’s surface.

2. Know how cold affects battery life and sensors

Colder temperatures shorten the flight time of your drone by slowing the chemical reaction with the LiPo batteries and lowering the battery capacity. A fully charged drone that typically will last between 20 to 25 minutes in flight, could fly for just 10-15 minutes in colder weather. Extreme cold weather can cause an unexpected power drop, and while it’s rare, there have been cases where batteries fail completely.

Cold weather dulls the drone’s sensors which can cause the drone to drift or have less response from the control input. In addition, cold fingers or gloves make controlling the input more difficult.

3. Practice good battery health

When flying in cold weather, understanding how to make your battery go further can be to your advantage.

  • Keep your batteries warm.
  • Hover after the takeoff.
  • Maintain a full charge on your batteries.
  • Go light on the throttle.
  • Bring a portable charger for the mobile device.

Continue reading 8 tips for flying a drone in cold weather

Last-minute holiday drone deals are here on DJI Mavic, Spark and more

Holding out on buying a drone for a great holiday deal? Now may be your chance.

B&H Photo has just launched a slew of new holiday drone deals, including $100 off the DJI Spark PLUS  a free $50 B&H gift card, $300 off the DJI Phantom 4 and $400 off the Yuneec Typhoon H.

Plus, you can still nab tons of deals from Amazon and directly from the manufacturer.

Here are some of the best drone-related deals:dji mavic pro review drone girl

For photographers, small business owners and “prosumers”:

DJI Mavic Pro Fly More Combo: regularly priced at $1,149. The DJI Mavic Pro is still my favorite drone to-date, though it will cost you about twice as much as the DJI Spark.

DJI Mavic Pro Standard Bundle: regularly priced at $999

Katana Tray System for DJI Mavic: regularly priced at $49.99. The tray utilizes the Mavic’s gimbal to turn the drone into a hand-held solution for smooth, cinematic shots. It’s essentially an integrated smartphone mount, in which users rely on the drone’s companion app for framing and camera controls.

Yuneec Typhoon Hexacopter: regularly priced at $1,199. The Yuneec Typhoon H is an incredibly sturdy drone for prosumers and businesses alike. One of the best — and most noticeable — features about the Typhoon H compared to many drones is the 6 rotors, giving it a redundancy and making it a safe choice.

GoPro Karma Quadcopter with HERO5 Black: regularly priced at $1,099. The GoPro Karma Quadcopter with HERO5 Black puts your GoPro camera in the air. When you’re done flying, you can use the camera and its gimbal to get that silky smooth video on the ground.

Continue reading Last-minute holiday drone deals are here on DJI Mavic, Spark and more

How AEB can help your drone photography

The following blog post is a guest piece from Chris Anderson, the creator of the site The Drone Trainer.

Modern drones often come with the possibility to capture mind-boggling images at several different exposures, and create stunning HDR (High Dynamic Range) photos. But with that comes an onslaught of HDR photos that are far overdone — and basically burn your eyes.

Here’s your guide on how to create natural looking HDR photos with your drone, using AEB (Automatic Exposure Bracketing).

What is AEB?

When shooting in AEB mode, your drone’s camera will automatically take three or five shots, each at a different exposure level. On their own, these individual photos are going to be under- and over-exposed. That’s okay though; once you merge them together, you’re going to have a thing of beauty!

Let’s work through this AEB example:

These photos were captured by setting my DJI Phantom 4 Pro to shoot in AEB 5 mode. To adjust this, simply go into your camera settings (right side of your screen below the shutter button), and in photo mode select AEB. You’ll be able to choose 3 or 5 once in AEB mode, depending on the scene that you’re looking to shoot. I find that for scenes that are well lit, AEB 5 works well as all 5 of the photos will capture sharp detail. Continue reading How AEB can help your drone photography

DJI Spark discount: B&H Photo is offering sweet deals on DJI Spark drone

Still holding out on the DJI Spark? Now is the time to buy the tiny camera drone.

B&H Photo is offering a pretty sweet DJI Spark discount.

Purchase the DJI Spark quadcopter in any color from B&H Photo and get a $50 gift card. Or, purchase the DJI Spark Combo (totally worth grabbing to get the RC transmitter included) to get a $70 gift card.

See my review of the DJI Spark here.

The gift card can be used to purchase anything from B&H’s store, so you can grab an extra memory card, DJI Spark battery or — gasp(!) — non-drone related item. If you opt not to get the Spark Fly More Combo, it’s worth at least upgrading to the RC transmitter.

Read more: DJI Mavic Pro vs. Spark: which is better?

B&H also offers free expedited shipping — so no problem if you don’t have an Amazon Prime account.

DJI now offering drone education discount to students and teachers with additional Spark deals

Are you a student, a teacher, or academic researcher?

DJI has a drone education discount program — and the deals are incredible.

The DJI Educational Discount allows customers with a “.edu” email address and who successfully fill out DJI’s online form to get a 10% discount on a select group of items.  The items available for purchase include everything from drones like the Mavic Pro, accessories like DJI Goggles and –for those who prefer shooting from the ground — the Osmo Mobile.

Related read: DJI Mavic Pro review: everything a flawless drone should be

And from now until Aug. 24, shoppers who apply online can get an additional discount on the Spark Fly More Combo.

The Spark Fly More Combo is typically $699, but can be purchased with the student discount for $629, and between Aug. 22 and 24 for just $615.

Here’s how it works:

 

 

 

 

Here are some other items you can get with the student discount:

Check out the full deals on DJI’s Education Page here.

DJI is hosting a summer sale: get DJI Spark deals and more!

Waiting for the perfect moment to buy a drone? Hoped to buy a drone for your last minute summer vacation? This should come as good news then. DJI drones are on summer sale!

Sale items include the DJI Spark, DJI Mavic Pro, Osmo Mobile and more.

Most of the sale consists of full price items plus free add-on items like batteries — which could prove to be a big money-saver since you’ll definitely want a spare battery anyway. Other items include freebies like t-shirts, “skins” for the Spark and more.

Here are some of the sale items:

DJI Spark: Purchase a Spark at full price, and receive 2 free Spark Skins and a t-shirt

Mavic Pro: Purchase a Mavic Pro at full price, and receive 2 free Mavic Pro skins and a landing pad

Osmo Mobile: Purchase Osmo Mobile at full price, and receive a free Osmo base and intelligent battery

OnePlus Backpack Combos: The sleek OnePlus backpacks are heavily discounted when purchased with a DJI drone

Check out the full sale here!

8 tips for starting your own aerial photography business — and making money while doing it

I have a recurring feature on my site called Ask Drone Girl. People have asked me about topics including FPV’s impact on eyesight, international travel with a drone, legal airspace, drone video music, LCD brightness and even a potential drone stalking situation.

But far and away the biggest question I get is centered around one topic: money.

What do I study in school to get a job in drones? What kind of revenue can I expect? Is there a set amount of hours you need to fly to become an expert?

But the most common scenario is people who have a drone and are looking to start an aerial photography business.

I figured the best way to give advice was to crowd-source from the pros. I reached out to some of the top aerial photographers in the business to get their advice:

  1. Use social media. Whether it’s Instagram, Facebook or a drone-photo sharing site, stay active posting on social media. “These days almost everyone has a Facebook, Twitter, and /or Instagram account,” said Stacy Garlington, founder of the DJI Aerial Photography Academy.

“By posting your best images this will get the word out that you are serious about pursuing aerial imaging.” Along those lines, join online communities. There are tons of drone Facebook groups, Slack channels and forums to share your work, as well as learn from others.

“There you can keep up to date with what’s going on in the industry and share images and experiences with like-minded folks,” Garlington said.

2. Find a niche. Don’t just photograph everything and spread yourself thin.  Figure out one or two niches. Whether it’s real estate, weddings, or something else completely, become a pro in that field. “Rather than have a huge list of services and a crazy demo reel, show you’re an expert in one specific field,” said Drone Depot distributor Alex Wright in a past Drone Girl article. “I came into a market that was quite saturated already as a pilot, so I focused on boating. I made boats my niche. I’m the boat guy! And that worked so well for me.”

3. Post your work. If your client allows you to, share your work online so potential customers know you’re business is growing. At the very least, include testimonies from past clients so potential new ones have a reference point.

4. Don’t neglect sales! Even if you see yourself as a photographer, ultimately you are a salesperson. “Sales are the lifeblood of any business,” said SkyNinja founder Taylor Mitcham. “Without sales, all you have is an expensive hobby.”

5. Network. You never know when that one email you almost deleted ultimately turns into your biggest gig.  And don’t forget to follow up on all leads.

“Even if it’s 3×5 cards in a box, the business won’t come to you,” said Skyshot founder Casey Saumure. “You have to go get it.”

6. Decide when you can work for free, and when you need to get paid. Ultimately it’s a business and you deserve to be paid for your work. But that pro bono project could lead to something bigger and better.

And decide when you are willing to let magazines publish your work for free.

“Don’t be surprised if magazines, newspapers, and other publishing agencies want to print your images for free,” Garlington said. “In general, they no longer need to pay for images since the internet is saturated with talent. Allow them to use your images and add the publication to your resume.”

But don’t forget to get paid too! Garlington suggests that stock agencies such as Adobe Stock, Getty or Shutterstock are outlets to get residual income.

7. Build a professional website. 

“An established online presence — website and/or social media — is a must! One that tells a little bit about you/your company, but more importantly includes a photo portfolio of your work,” said Kim Wheeler, one half of the 2Drone Gals team.

 Come up with a memorable URL (can you avoid the cliches like ‘Sky’, ‘Aerial’ or ‘Air’ in your business name? Design a great logo that stands out. And even if you don’t have coding chops, build a great website. Drone photographer Kara Murphy built hers on Squarespace for less than $200.

“Set up analytics so you know what’s driving your traffic,” Murphy said.

8. Perfect your demo reel.  Carys Keiser, who does work primarily for British broadcast TV and other European production companies and also edits the BBC’s showreels speaks from experience.

Keep the demo reel short and sweet, between 1 to 2 minutes. Remove any illegal drone footage, copyrighted music, and cut out distractions like graphics or weird editing techniques.

“What they want to see is ungraded footage from the drone,” Kaiser said, advising that photographers remove color grading or post=-processed stabilization. Put variety in your reel, whether it’s landscapes, locations, time of day and even time of year.

“Try not to show everything in sunlight,” Kaiser said. “Shoot dark skies and winter weather, and include people if you can.”

Do you have your own aerial photography business tips? I’d love to hear them! Leave a comment below.

Drone mapping: what’s the difference between drone spatial resolution vs. accuracy?

“We can get 1cm with our drone!”

Have you heard someone in the drone industry say something similar to this?  For drone mapping professional Jon Ellinger, the creator of TLT Photography, which specializes in aerial surveys, geospatial data processing and fine photography, he gets it a lot.

So much so, that Ellinger wrote up a great guide to what spatial resolution really means, as well as understanding the difference between spatial resolution vs. accuracy. Here goes:

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With affordable drones such as the GoPro Karma, and DJI Mavic and Spark becoming accessible to people of all educational backgrounds it makes sense that there is sometimes confusion about what the specifications of the drone really mean.  Unless you have a geography background, are an avid photographer, or someone who works with geospatial data regularly you may not realize what a vague statement that is.  Grab a coffee and let me explain… Continue reading Drone mapping: what’s the difference between drone spatial resolution vs. accuracy?