Video: Fire fuels prairie revival

More videos are coming soon, but to old you over, here is an uncovered relic from Drone Girl’s past:

I didn’t always fly under Drone Girl moniker. When I first got into drones, it was as photographer for the Missouri School of Journalism’s drone journalism program, the first of its kind in the nation, where footage captured from the drone was used for NPR-member station KBIA.

This footage is shot by my former colleague Brendan Gibbons, and produced and edited by yours truly. It goes to show the scope of images that a drone can capture. Imagine a fire that starts too quickly for a helicopter to deploy, or that is too hot or dangerous to send a helicopter over. In order to capture video of the fire, a drone is a relatively easy and cheap alternative, allowing us to see the direction of the fire and its size from a safe, aerial vantage point. Continue reading Video: Fire fuels prairie revival

Find Drone Girl elsewhere on the web

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Can’t get enough of Drone Girl? Eh, I’m willing to bet you can. But if you absolutely, positively can’t, then find me on Twitter and Instagram!

Check out my Twitter account, @TheDroneGirl, to get links to some of my top blog posts, as well as links to other relevant drone stories in the news, and the most up-to-date information on where Drone Girl is flying next.

For photos posted here (as well as some bonus, never-before-seen images) in vintage, vignetted, sepia-toned glory, then check out my Instagram account. It’s my personal account, so you’ll have to put up with lots of sans-drone photos, including many from my kitchen documenting my obsessive cooking habit. But you’ll also get an occasional drone picture thrown in there!

I’m always looking for suggestions, so let me know your thoughts by leaving a comment below or through my contact page!

First EVER video: flying over O’Neill Park

I’m so excited to announce the release of my first video! It’s pretty basic (Drone Girl is pretty lo-tech, operating off a beater 2010 MacBook with a broken keyboard and made using iMovie). But I’m proud to have put together something, especially since that was one of my goals, as stated in my latest Flight Diary.

This video was shot entirely using my GoPro and Drone, and I basically just flew around the park, trying to get a variety of shots. Please comment with your thoughts and suggestions!

Video shot, produced and edited by Sally French, with music provided through Free Music Archive by Podington Bear.

Eyes over O’Neill Park

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O’Neill Park is one of my favorite places in the world! It’s a large park, pretty long and narrow extending past where I grew up. It’s 4,000 acres of chaparral beauty, and few chances of running into civilization.

As a kid, we’d catch frogs in the creek, and as an older person, I like to hike through it! If you’re really in for a workout, try climbing to the top of Saddleback Mountain! If you don’t feel like hiking to the top of Saddleback, then hopefully these drone images will satisfy your desire for an aerial view of the park!

But real talk, nothing beats the in-person, super-high view you get from the top of Saddleback. The drone’s image is merely the penultimate view of the park.

Flight diaries: Catching up with Drone Girl

Screen shot 2013-07-18 at 8.58.58 PMAnother week has flown by (no pun intended), and the drone is still going strong. But where is Drone Girl headed next? That’s up in the air.

With another week of flying under my belt, I’ve definitely been thinking more visually now, rather than just using a fancy technology. There should be a purpose for using a technology, and I think drones can put a lot of things in perspective via an aerial view. I’m recently most proud of my golf course photo, which I think accomplishes that. The photo shows the viewer how close the tees are to each other, what surrounds each hole, how large each hole is, etc. That’s something that your standard golf match photo can’t show. I studied photojournalism in college, so now that I’m better at flying, I want to think about good photography practices — visually appealing images (ie the good ole’ rule of thirds, leading lines, etc) that don’t just rely on the novelty factory of an aerial angle.

I’m considering doing video. It’ll take more time and effort, but in the next few weeks, I’m going to experiment with short videos. Stay tuned, and thanks for keeping up with Drone Girl!

What’s behind Tesoro?

If you’ve ever been to Tesoro High School, you’ve probably always heard rumors of the cow-tipping that renegade students did in the wee hours of the morning. Behind the cement school, there is open space — and a lot of it. In my four years though, I, like most students, never made it back there, because that land was inaccessible.

But now, the drone cam can show off what is hidden by trees or not possible to see otherwise. By standing in the public Tesoro field, you can see the great beyond!

Screen shot 2013-07-18 at 8.47.58 PMAnd for those of you who just care to see the high school and want another shot similar to what I showed yesterday, here’s YET ANOTHER drone shot, this time of the Tesoro baseball fields! Pretty, right?Screen shot 2013-07-18 at 8.47.49 PM

 

High school throwback (of the future)

I wasn’t flying a drone in my high school days. But these days, I can fly a drone over my high school.Screen shot 2013-07-18 at 10.25.35 PM

The photo below is of Tesoro High School in Las Flores, Ca, where I attended for four years. The high school is down in the canyon, in the middle of nowhere. Ask any Tesoro student, and they’ll probably share with you all about fighting for that last parking space at the top of the hill, the 6:40 a.m. Zero Period start time, tutorials, and our awesome football team. If you don’t have a local Tesoro student to chat with, hopefully this photo helps capture part of the campus. Take note of the rolling hills in the background, the stellar pool, and our mascot painting on the building (he sort of resembles Santa Claus, no?).

Drone Girl

Reporting on drones, sometimes with drones