Enter your footage in the NYC Drone Film Festival

Think your drone footage is better than this? Then enter it in the New York City Drone Film Festival, accepting submissions now through December 28, 2014. The sites website states:

New York City Drone Film Festival is the world’s first event exclusively dedicated to celebrating the art of drone cinematography.  The festival provides a platform for aerial filmmakers to showcase their work, emphasizing innovative flight technique, aesthetic beauty, and even epic crashes.  Director, landscape photographer, and aerial cinematographer Randy Scott Slavin founded the festival in 2014 with a desire to change the perceptions of drones. “I’m tired of drones being synonymous with questionable legality and FAA regulation. I want to celebrate the art of aerial cinematography.”

Entries must be under 5 minutes in length and will be judged based on categories including technical difficulty and innovation.

For more information and to enter, visit NYC Drone Film Festival.

What is the deal with the drone cage?

You’ve seen them before. It’s a bird, it’s a plane…nope, it’s a zoo. What are these cages that people are flying drones in?

photo 1We asked drone fan Andrew Amato of Drone Life for his best guess during a press event for DJI’s Inspire 1 (there was in fact a drone cage present).

“I guess it’s safety first,” he said. “Sense and avoid is the next thing they have to work on, so until we have, we’ll have these.”

We also asked DJI spokesman Michael Perry for the official answer.

“There’s this psychological concern when we’re out of the tents,” Perry said. “When we’re flying at events, either people would be standing back, or we can put a cage and people will get closer to them. It’s a better experience and saves space. We’ve made something that is easily transportable and easy to set up.”

Is it to keep the drones in or the people out?

“Probably both,” Amato said. “Did you see the drink menu (at the DJI Inspire 1 event)?”

The drink menu includes items named after drones, including the Phantom. They’re all sparkly, fruity cocktails – who knew a Phantom would taste like tequila with some watermelon and lime juice?

photo 2 copy

“Too many Phantoms,” Amato said, “and you don’t want to be crashing the actual Phantom.”

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DJI’s Inspire 1 just changed the game

Just two years ago (it feels like an eternity now) I was deciding what drone to buy. I had ambitions to use drones for aerial videography in journalism — capturing stories of protests, fires or sporting events from above.

The options were limited. Like, 2 options limited. Option 1: scary alien hunk of metal flying the sky. Probably built myself. Therefore likely wouldn’t even get up in the air. Option 2: Toy drones. Shoots video that isn’t exactly broadcast quality. Is more shaky, rolling shutter than video. Probably purchased from Sharper Image (does that store still exist?)

Followers of my blog know that I bought and love my original Phantom (my avatar girl is flying a knock-off Phantom). But it also just never quite did the trick.

Enter: The Inspire 1.

DJI’s newest drone goes beyond the hobbyist market and into enterprise uses including search and rescue and humanitarian efforts. And of course, journalism.

DJI's Inspire 1

Priced at $3,399, it’s a big step above toy, but still affordable enough that small businesses could have a better shot at affording a tool that could completely change the way they operate.

“We’re taking really complex technology and now we’re making it more accessible,” DJI spokesman Michael Perry said. “Lightbridge used to be $1,000. Now it’s integrated into the system. We’ve grow  up to keep up with demand.”

DJI's Inspire 1 camera and gimbalWhat’s the big selling point for journalists? The new camera and gimbal system. Finally, the built-in camera shoots up to 4k video and captures 12 megapixel photos. This will eliminate the monotonous wide angle shots and produce broadcast quality footage. Continue reading DJI’s Inspire 1 just changed the game

5 things people think the new Inspire 1 looks like

DJI announced Wednesday their newest drone, the Inspire 1. Steering away from the charming, toyish Phantom line of drones that resemble Wall*E’s friend Eve, DJI’s newest drone means business. Here’s what you thought it looked like:

Just in time for the new Star Wars movie!

Continue reading 5 things people think the new Inspire 1 looks like

DJI’s newest drone, Inspire 1 with 3-axis gimbal and retractable landing gear

DJI tonight announced its newest drone that goes beyond the hobbyist market and into enterprise uses including search and rescue and humanitarian efforts.

No longer the cute DJI Phantom with rounded edges that look more reminiscent of Wall*E’s friend Eve than a scary robot, this drone has drawn influences from the Parrot style. Oh, and it has retractable landing gear.

So what sets this apart from the Phantom? For one, check out the camera. It produces high-definition, 4k, 360-degree aerial video that streams back to the device in real time. Plus, it’s got retractable landing gear.

Some specs:

  • 6 pounds
  • Flies up to 45 mph
  • Soar as far as 300 meters up into the sky
  • Can reach 700 meters from the operator
  • Return-to-home feature
  • 18-minute flight time (compared with 25 minutes for the Phantom)

The Inspire 1 will sell for around $3,000.

Behind-the-scenes: flying drones over a volcano eruption

Happy Saturday!

In case you missed it, here’s a throwback to last month’s debut episode of their series “DJI Feats.” DJI’s Director of Aerial Imaging, Eric Cheng, takes you behind-the-scenes of an Icelandic expedition to the Bardarbunga volcanic eruption.

The video shows how quadcopters can capture images of exploding magma caldera too dangerous to be approached by manned aircraft. Where else can a drone take you?

A waterfall flight with a not-so-happy-ending

Remember earlier this week when I showed you the video of the slack liners? How I asked about how terrifying flying over water can be, as you risk losing your drone?

Whelp, I got a brave reader submission willing to share his video. The intro is beautifully shot, both in terms of ground and drone footage. Let’s just say, the ending is not-so-happy. *Spoiler alert: it ends up in the Nile.

The pilot, Petr Jan Juračka, built the drone, a 3DR ArduCopter Quad C Frame, and took it to Arru Falls in Uganda.

“After our escapade at the falls, we visited the second-largest waterfall in Africa, Murchison Falls,” he wrote. “One of the rotors on our drone unexpectedly shut down at 150s altitude, and we are sorry to say the quadcopter now rests at the bottom of the Nile among the skeletons of hippos and crocodiles.”

Sorry to hear about the rotor malfunction. You’re probably not alone though (the other voters will tell you that).

Thanks Petr Jan Juračka for the submission!