FAA announces public research and test sites of drones

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced today the six public entities that will serve as research and test sites for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS).

“These congressionally-mandated test sites will conduct critical research into the certification and operational requirements necessary to safely integrate UAS into the national airspace over the next several years,” an FAA news release stated.

The sites are:

  • University of Alaska. The University of Alaska proposal contained a diverse set of test site range locations in seven climatic zones as well as geographic diversity with test site range locations in Hawaii and Oregon. The research plan includes the development of a set of standards for unmanned aircraft categories, state monitoring and navigation. Alaska also plans to work on safety standards for UAS operations.
  • State of Nevada. Nevada’s project objectives concentrate on UAS standards and operations as well as operator standards and certification requirements. The applicant’s research will also include a concentrated look at how air traffic control procedures will evolve with the introduction of UAS into the civil environment and how these aircraft will be integrated with NextGen. Nevada’s selection contributes to geographic and climatic diversity.
  • New York’s Griffiss International Airport.Griffiss International plans to work on developing test and evaluation as well as verification and validation processes under FAA safety oversight. The applicant also plans to focus its research on sense and avoid capabilities for UAS and its sites will aid in researching the complexities of integrating UAS into the congested, northeast airspace.
  • North Dakota Department of Commerce. North Dakota plans to develop UAS airworthiness essential data and validate high reliability link technology. This applicant will also conduct human factors research. North Dakota’s application was the only one to offer a test range in the Temperate (continental) climate zone and included a variety of different airspace which will benefit multiple users.
  • Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi. Texas A&M plans to develop system safety requirements for UAS vehicles and operations with a goal of protocols and procedures for airworthiness testing. The selection of Texas A&M contributes to geographic and climactic diversity.
  • Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech).Virginia Tech plans to conduct UAS failure mode testing and identify and evaluate operational and technical risks areas. This proposal includes test site range locations in both Virginia and New Jersey.

This information follows the Nov. 7 announcement of the UAS Roadmap, which focuses on the regulations, policies and procedures necessary to UAS’ into FAA-regulated airspace.

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Merry Christmas from Drone Girl!

Thanks to you, our readers, for a great year of learning, researching and of course, drone flying!  Have a safe and happy holidays, and perhaps you can even spend this day flying your drones!

photo

Thanks to reader Davis Hunt for sharing this photo, taken by Instagrammer thorvath0715.

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5 drone videos that will knock your stockings off with Christmas spirit

Need to get into the Christmas spirit? Trapped indoors with nothing but your laptop? Want to show off some awesome videos at your family holiday gathering? Here are 5 Christmas videos that celebrate drones. Merry Christmas!

5. The Mistletoe Drone

Drones give mistletoe a boost this year by helping them maximize their power over Union Square in San Francisco!

4. Autonomous Christmas Lab

This one isn’t solely UAVs, but robots of all kinds!

Continue reading 5 drone videos that will knock your stockings off with Christmas spirit

Transparency Watch: Why is the FAA 6 months overdue on sharing public information about regulating drone operators?

The FAA has stated that they will release an updated law by Sept. 30, 2015 that would allow commercial drone use. Until then, commercial drone use is illegal.

Numerous drone operators have been issued Cease and Desist letters by the FAA. But it’s unclear exactly who has gotten letters. (All we’re aware of is what we’ve discovered online through forum, blog and web searches.) That’s why TheDroneGirl.com submitted a Freedom of Information Act request to the FAA, requesting copies of all the letters that have been sent out.

In March of 0f 2013, our friends over at MuckRock.com requested the same thing  and have not received the information they requested.

Thus, the FAA is 6 months overdue on fulfilling their public records request.

Since we have yet to receive public records from the FAA, in the meantime, Drone Girl has created an online Document Tracker to study where and to whom the letters of gone. Check out our document tracker here. Continue reading Transparency Watch: Why is the FAA 6 months overdue on sharing public information about regulating drone operators?

Drone Girl’s 2013 Holiday Gift Guide

dji_phantomThis is the last weekend for Christmas shopping, so why not hit-the-ground running with some of the most epic last-minute Christmas gifts you’ve given in your life – drones!

This guide is broken down into copters best for beginners, photographers and tech geeks. Think I missed something? Leave a comment below!

For the beginner:

TOP PICK: WL Toys V959 Quadcopter RC 4 Channel V989

  • Price: $67.55
  • This is Drone Girl’s top pick for an entry-level copter. Why? It’s reliable and includes an onboard camera. Obviously the video quality is not great, but it will be something you can post on Facebook, because who doesn’t want a quick aerial video of building a snowman or Christmas day sledding?
  • Pro: Good price, easy to use out of the box, good for learning how to fly and shoots video
  • Con: 8-10 minutes of flight time, low video quality

nano-qx-bnf-micro-quadcopter-with-safe-technology-blh7680-3965-pBlade Nano QX Micro Quadcopter RTF

  • Price: $89.99
  • This is a teeny-tiny remote-controlled gift that is a cross between cereal box toy and Amazon drone. It has an impressive technology system that can hover and zip around, but it’s about 2 inches tall.
  • Pro: Fun! Low-risk. Durable, good intro to drone technology and flying techniques
  • Con: My short-attention span would get bored with this real fast. It flies, and it flies, and that’s about it.

Syma X1 4 Channel 2.4G RC Quad Copter

  • $43.00
  • This is the cheapest gift on the Drone Girl gift guide. It can’t do much except fly around. But it is a cool party trick! Fly it around your backyard, and if you’re daring, maybe even your house!
  • Pro: Cheaper than the Blade Nano! Fun! Low-risk. Durable, good intro to drone technology and flying techniques
  • Con: Technology is not quite as sophisticated as the Blade Nano. Again, my short-attention span would get bored with this real fast. It flies, and it flies, and that’s about it.

For the techie:

Parrot-AR.Drone-2.0TOP PICK: Parrot AR Drone 2.0 Power Edition

  • Price: $369.99
  • This drone comes complete with a built-in video camera and can be controlled on Android or iOS devices via a WiFi connection. This drone can fly around and take pictures. You can also hack it (if you have the skillz) to make it do much more than that. Remember the guy who was able to forcefully disconnect other Parrot drones from their wifi signal and take control, turning them into zombie drones?
  • Pros: incredible updates allow for 36 minutes of flying time
  • Great for your favorite computer hacker; this software is (relatively) easily customizable
  • Cons: Hardware isn’t very customizable. Has a built-in camera, so you’re stuck with that and don’t have much in the way of upgrading

*Money-saving tip: Buy last year’s model, though it doesn’t quite have the same power capacity.

TBS Discovery Pro Starter Set

  • Price: $2,265,95
  • This is an all-in-one package for a serious dronie who wants the satisfaction of building it themselves. This guy will run you about $2,000 more than I have, but TBS is top-of-the-line. This kit requires you to build it yourself, which could be a struggle for some, or for others considered way fun. Team Black Sheep are some of the leaders in the drone world, and now you too can be just like them!
  • Included in this kit is FPV capabilities, so you can see what the drone camera sees, a gimbal, batteries, and really all you need to do some professional flying.
  • Pros: Fancy. Really well made. Comes with all the parts you need in one kit.
  • Con: Expen$ive!

For the photographer:
dji-phantom-vision2TOP PICK: DJI Phantom 2 Vision

  • Price: $1,119.00
  • This is the Holy Grail of UAV technology, the king of the drones. But royalty isn’t cheap. This is the priciest drone on the Drone Girl Photography Gift Guide, but if you get what you pay for, then you’ve just gotten the best.
    It’s ready to fly right out of the box, allowing you to gather clean and clear video within a couple hours of flight practice.
    If you can spring it, buy this one!
  • Pros: Comes with an on-board camera (1080p HD video), Live-stream video to free Vision app for iOS or Android, Camera tilt compensates for single-axis motion = buttery smooth video
  • 25 minutes of flight time
  • Cons: It co$t$ a lot of money!

*However, this drone comes with so many new and great features like live streaming of video, 25 minutes of flight time, camera included and a gimbal. Had you bought the original Phantom and wanted to add on these things later yourself, that would cost you more money. So look on the bright side, this is a savings!

DJI Phantom (Original Model)

  • Price: $479.00
  • This is last year’s model of the DJI Phantom 2 Vision (described above). This is the perfect pick if you’re looking to cut costs but want a great product. This is very similar to the Phantom 2 Vision but with fewer features. The camera won’t be as smooth unless you add on your own gimbal (which is quite an ordeal) and you can’t live-stream what your camera sees, but it’s still a great option.
  • Pros: Ready-to-fly out of the box, reliable product, easy to use, reasonable price for what you get
  • Cons: Video isn’t quite professional quality, but is sure close (unless you add your own gimbal)*Note: this doesn’t come with a camera, but you can add on your own GoPro.

Blade 350 QX RTF

  • Price: $469.99
  • This medium quality quadcopter offers you the ability to shoot aerial images and video via a GoPro camera. With multiple modes, the copter is easy to fly, allowing beginner pilots to learn on Smart Mode or allowing advanced pilots to flip and roll in Agility Mode.
  • *Note: this doesn’t come with a camera, but you can add on your own GoPro.
  • Pros: Lots of different modes catering to beginning and advanced pilots, ability to mount a GoPro
  • Cons: Not the most reliably built, with some cheap parts that don’t sustain damage quite as well as its competitors

And in case you were wondering, no, you can’t have your drone delivered by Amazon Drone. Not this year, at least.

So the bottom line is, with all these choices, what would Drone Girl do?

Here's me with my original DJI Phantom. I recommend this as a Top Pick because it's easy-to-use out of the box, reliable and on sale now! Photo courtesy of Stuart Palley.
Here’s me with my original DJI Phantom. I recommend this as a Top Pick because it’s easy-to-use out of the box, reliable and on sale now! Photo courtesy of Stuart Palley.

Start by getting a cheap toy copter to master the controls. Flying a drone entails two sticks, which is analogous to the whole rub your stomach while pat your head deal. Not impossible, but takes practice.

You will crash into a tree. You might get it stuck on top of a building. And hopefully you don’t fly it into a pool.

That’s why you should master the controls on a cheap drone, like the Syma X1 RC Quadcopter UFO, which will cost you $43.
Then move onto a better drone with professional shooting capabilities. My pick? The DJI Phantom 2 Vision.

Yes, it’s the priciest. But if you are interested in having smooth, professional grade video, the DJI Phantom 2 Vision offers an all-in-one package to do that. Whether you’re looking to get professional quality video with minimal effort, want a quick, convenient way to live-stream what the drone sees, or have a reliably built copter, this is your pick. This is a great copter for photographers, scientists, researchers, or anyone with a hefty sum of spare change who wants to experience something new.

Happy flying, AND Happy Holidays!

Related posts:
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Calling all drone operators who have received cease and desist letters

documenttrackerAre you a drone operator who has received a cease and desist letter? Please get in contact with us, because we want to talk to you!

It is currently illegal to operate a drone for commercial purposes – that is until 2015, a date Congress declared for FAA to allow commercial drone use.

Until then, the FAA has delivered letters to select commercial drone pilots requiring they cease operations. It’s unclear which of the many commercial drone pilots out there have received letters. Some have been told to stop flying and have been to subject to fines for noncompliance. But the majority of commercial drone pilots continue to operate drones with no contact from the FAA. Those pilots include contractors for real estate agents who want fancy ways to demonstrate their properties, filmmakers and more.

Why is this?

We need your help to track down who all the letters have gone to. We’ve put in FOIA requests, to no avail. So our hope is you will send yours directly to us!

Check out our new page that documents all the groups we know of that have received cease and desist letters.

Al Jazeera explores drone journalism, featuring Drone Girl herself

ajAl Jazeera’s Listening Post feature this week takes a look at drones and how they are becoming tools of the journalistic trade.

“More and more news stories, particularly those on television, now include video shot by drones,” the latest update on Al Jazeera’s Listening Post page states. “Listening Post’s Will Yong reports on the potential – and some of the pitfalls – of the media’s unmanned eyes in the skies.”

You can listen to me, Sally (aka Drone Girl), talk drone journalism alongside our friend Matthew Schroyer, founder of DroneJournalism.org on the latest Listening Post episode here.

In other drone journalism news, the BBC has an entire news story taught by drone. Their bird’s eye view of a protest rally in Thailand is told via drone, including a stand-up.

Happy flying!

Drone Girl

Reporting on drones, sometimes with drones